Category Archives: Dog Training Guide

Dog Training Guide

Dog Training Equipments

The sports centered on testing dog agility may be an enjoyable challenge not only for the dog, but for the trainer as well. This team sport plans to test the dog’s rate and mind when completing a path despite being faced with various types of barriers. Basically, the trainer leads the dog to undergo a class that’s filled with challenges. The dog then ran to the complete line and its speed and precision are gauged. In contests, the dog ought to be able to complete the class showing utmost eagerness and intelligence in facing the challenges. The trainer may only utilize his voice and body signs to instruct the dog and the challenge must be surpassed without revealing the dog any kind of incentive or reward to be anticipated after the race.

Dog Training Equipment

Training a dog for agility sport makes your dog intelligent and tactical. It will help your dog maintain a well coordinated body and mind. It also makes him/her more alert and keen, and cautious of his\/her actions. On your part, training a dog for agility may be an incredibly fulfilling and entertaining encounter. If you need to train your dog for agility sport, then be certain that you have the right dose of endurance and perseverance. Besides that, you ought to check the ability and the abilities of your dog. At the top of anything else, you need to get yourself the right dog training equipment.

A comprehensive set of agility equipment will assist your dog to keep obedience and obtain obstacle familiarization. There are various dog training equipment which are sold in pet stores. For a wider variety to select from, you can purchase training materials via the Internet. Typically, each agility training item is sold separately. Some on-line pet stores provide extensive sets. Other even offer free shipping, discount rates, and warranty. In selecting the dog agility training items, do pick one that suits your dog’s size, behaviour, overall temperament, and breed. It’ll assist if the gear you’ll use attracts the dog through his drawings and color. Don’t compromise the function of the gear with its design.

The Power of Positive Reinforcement in Dog Training: An Evaluation

Rottweiler-Head
Those of you who have been following our blog will have read the coverage of negative dog training we did earlier. This post focuses on a popular and viable alternative: positive dog training.

For those who came in late, dog training can be negative and positive. Negative training implies physically punishing a dog’s failure to follow orders with immediate reinforcement, and while it is a very conventional method of dog training that is effective in certain scenarios, it is largely regarded as barbaric and primitive. Positive training, on the other hand, focuses on rewarding a dog’s success with food or affection. Here is more about it.

A Bit of History

The earliest mention of positive reinforcement that can be found in literature is in novelist Jack London’s books “Call of the Wild” and “White Fang”, both written in the late 1800s. However, the idea that positive reinforcement might be a viable alternative to punishment in behaviour modification was proposed by B F Skinner, an American cognitive psychologist, in 1971. However, in spite of its relatively antiquated roots, the technique only became popular in the latter half of the 20th century.

About the Technique

As stated earlier, positive dog training in Sunshine Coast focuses on rewards. Here is how it works – every time your dog learns to follow your instructions, you reward it. The “reward” can be physical and/or psychological. Physical rewards include foods and have a very immediate effect on the training. Psychological rewards are often just as effective as physical rewards and include affectionate gestures toward the dog. Studies have shown that in most household scenarios, dogs actually respond more to positive reinforcement than to punishment, and that with a reward-based system, canines grow up to be healthy adults with little or no collateral complications, which leads to them living longer and happier.

Pros and Cons

1. Positive reinforcement alone works best with dog breeds that are not aggressive. Certain aggressive breeds of dogs often require controlled amounts of negative reinforcement especially as adults.

2. Just like negative reinforcement, a dog will only associate a positive reinforcement with success when it is immediate. If your dog follows your order now and a reward is only imparted after say, fifteen seconds, it is likely that the dog will not manage to associate the reward with the (now distant) act of success. This will eventually confuse the dog and lead to complications that could be unmanageable at home.

3. “Rewards” in the form of food, when given repeatedly to a dog, often results in physical complications such as weight gain, heart and liver problems, and reduces the vitality and life span of a dog. There are most sophisticated dog training techniques such as “clicker “ training that uses a clicker as a replacement to a treat after a certain duration of time. Clicker training is probably the most used training technique by professional dog trainers in Sunshine Coast at the moment because it is safe from all perspectives and delivers quick results.

Why Are some Dogs More Difficult To Train?

Two rottweiler dogs playing in the park
Those working as professional dog trainers in Brisbane frequently come across owners who are at their wit’s end trying to train their dog to live cooperatively in their homes. In fact – a popular belief out there is that there are dogs out there that are un-trainable. However, not only is this belief untrue, it is also illogical – being out of control and troublesome not only makes life difficult for the owner, it also frustrates the dog. It is only natural that a canine in distress would work constructively to work its way out of it – that’s survival instinct. Why then, is it that some breeds of dogs are more difficult to train than others, and that certain dogs, irrespective of their breed, simply don’t respond to training even when done over lengthy periods of time?

Unmanageable Dogs

Many proficient trainers in Queensland think that the word “training” is often a misnomer of sorts, since the objective for most household dogs is not so much to impart specific skills to a dog as it is to teach them how to live in a human household. It’s only “training” if you’re teaching it tricks; at all other instance it is just communication.

Similarly to human babies, dogs will only act right when they feel right. Hence, an unmanageable dog immediately implies some sort of a communication barrier – that is – either the dog doesn’t understand what the trainer tries to communicate, or the trainer doesn’t understand the dog’s point of view. Here are some of the common behavioural traits that render a dog unmanageable:

1. Aggression for food or with other animals and even children
2. Being insubordinate – pulling on the leash etc.
3. Excessive barking
4. Biting
5. Chewing on furniture or other objects not meant to be chewed
6. Over-enthusiasm: jumping on people trying to get affection
7. Toilet-training issues
8. Uncontrollable anxiety – crying, wetting, overtly defensive behaviour

Most of these behavioural traits arise because the dog and the trainer are not on the same page. The purpose of effective dog training is to break the communication barrier through innovative modes of communication. Professional trainers who have been dealing with dogs for their entire work lives understand the issues perturbing a dog with surprising skill, and the issue often resolves itself quickly and simply. Note here, that every now and then, dog trainers come across canines living in households containing one or more genuinely abusive trainers (and this abuse can be either deliberate or inadvertent), and in such instances, it is informing the owner that is more essential than training the dog.

Online courses and informative content on dog training tips and tricks will often only cover basic techniques that any dog owner can try at home. However, dogs that prove themselves difficult to manage often require a more professional approach towards training and the pertinent and effective care that comes from being in the proximity of professional dog trainer. With the right perspective and methodology, dogs are really not that difficult to train.